Washington DC, as the location of the United States’ federal government, has had marches and protests for centuries. Protest tourism, however, is a term the organization has authored in light of the development and higher frequency of protests since President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017.

Protest tourism isn’t something that is occurring a result of destination’s promoting efforts, yet experts don’t get included in the progression of the events.

It’s not the organization’s place to take a side of a confrontation, including if the issue specifically impacts the travel sector, for example, the president’s travel ban. Marchers don’t touch anything political.

Protest tourism just from the point of view that people coming to Washington for the protest and keeping in mind that they’re there to ensure they’re mindful of the things to see and do. The organization doesn’t plan to announce the event on its social media channels other than to communicate data from law enforcement and emergency services. It’s the city’s part to communicate the streets that are shut. Authorities want to ensure guests know how to navigate the streets.

D.C. will quantify the number of hits to its washington.org site and perceive how frequently guests took a look at washington.org while they were in the city.

Washington.org site is responsive and will react to whatever device protesters are using, they don’t need to bother with downloading an application.

Numerous tourism boards, for the most part, maintain a strategic distance from social issues to draw the ire of the government officials who subsidize them. That is driven more private sector identities to advance up and help with these events, and explorers notice.

Particularly in a place like D.C. where numerous travelers visit particularly to better understand governmental issues and history, it makes one wonder if staying neutral makes the city ’s tourism board more relevant or far off to travelers.

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